How can I do well in school even if I don’t like it?

If there is no real relationship between academic achievement and attitude, then what motivates bright students to achieve academic success? It certainly isn’t from an abundant passion for school.

–Jihyun Lee, Why the most successful students have no passion for school

Over the weekend I met up with some pretty interesting people:

A statistician who works in HR analytics by day, and on his masters degree in statistics by night.

A computer science professor who’s one paper away from getting his PhD.

And the HR head of my university alma mater, who excused herself early to attend a class for her second master’s degree.

While we met to discuss a project we’re all part of, small talk couldn’t be avoided.

And given everyone’s backgrounds, it should be no surprise much of this small talk was on coursework, interesting class projects, and the research for whatever paper they were working on at the moment.

For someone who did not find value in what she learned in school, I felt very much out of place.

 

What we had in common: Went to the same top schools, got decent (if not good) grades, and got degrees known for being difficult.

What I did not have in common: I didn’t like it.

 

Turns out, doing well in school and having to like it don’t have to be mutually exclusive. At least according to this research by Jihyun Lee:

 

My research has found that there is in fact no relationship between how well students do academically and what their attitude toward schooling actually is. A student doesn’t need to be passionate about school to be academically successful.

 

So what does impact academic performance? Self-belief.

Collectively, research shows that students’ self-belief in their own problem-solving abilities is far more important than their perception of school itself.

 

To conclude, Jihyun makes similar recommendations as I did when I talked about why I disliked school: The education system needs to be revamped.

Adults responsible for making decisions about schooling need to be more cognisant about the long-term influences that the school experience can exert on students’ attitudes and beliefs. A stronger emphasis must also be given to the inclusion of hands-on group activities that emulate what they may do in life once they graduate.

 

The research was based on the results of a survey asked of 15-year-olds globally. Below is a sample of this survey, along with my answers:

(a) school has done little to prepare me for adult life when I leave school

True. Very much so.

(b) school has been a waste of time

Waste is too harsh a word. I made a lot of connections through school which I still utilize today. And I have to admit, coming from a top university has its own perks in today’s competitive job market.

Rather than waste, I’d say the time wasn’t optimized.

If the answer has to be strictly True or False though, then my answer leans closer to true.

(c) school helped give me confidence to make decisions

False

(d) school has taught me things that could be useful in a job

Given I have a degree in Chemical Engineering but work in IT, then False.

Granted, I am loooooonnnnggg past the age group the study was based on, but its pretty striking how my own experience-based opinion seems to match that of the students’.

 

My key takeaway from this research: Confidence in your own skills matters. Even more than “passion”.

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